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Posts for: October, 2017

By Summit Dental Group
October 29, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: crowns  
RoyalTreatmentforaDamagedTooth

If your tooth sustains damage that compromises its structure — typically through decay or trauma — you have several options depending on the extent of the damage: One of them is a crown. This method saves the tooth and its root and completely conceals the visible portion of the tooth, or crown, under a natural-looking cap made to mimic as closely as possible the size, shape and color of the original tooth.

Crowns also hide imperfections in the original tooth like discoloration, chipping, fractures, excessive wear (from bruxism, or tooth grinding, for example), or abnormalities in the way the tooth formed. And they’re used following root canal treatments, which treat infected pulp at the center (canal) of a tooth root by removing the pulp and replacing it with an inert, rubber-like material.

Saving the natural tooth has long been the goal of dentistry because normal micromovements of the tooth root, which is suspended in its jawbone socket by elastic ligaments, stimulate the surrounding bone to rejuvenate. Without that stimulation, the bone continues to lose old cells, but no longer replaces them. Crowns are also designed to restore tooth function.

The function and location of the damaged tooth can determine what material the crown will be made of. If the damaged tooth is clearly visible when you smile, porcelain, the most realistic-looking material, is almost always used. If the tooth receives significant bite force, a stronger material is considered — either, a gold/porcelain combination, or a high-strength ceramic. If you are restoring a second molar, an all-gold crown may be considered.

With the advent of dental implants, saving a damaged tooth is no longer the only option for preserving the health of the bone surrounding the tooth root. The implant — a tiny biocompatible, titanium screw-like artificial root — is placed in the jawbone and is then capped with a natural-looking crown of course!

If you would like more information about dental crowns, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Crowns & Bridgework.”


By Summit Dental Group
October 17, 2017
Category: Dentist
Tags: veneers   cosmetic dentistry  

Dental veneers help you show off your best possible smile. Veneers conceal a variety of cosmetic problems and imperfections in teeth. veneersUneven surfaces, discolorations, cracks, chips and uneven spacing between teeth can all be corrected with veneers. In Waterford, MI, dental veneers are placed by Dr. Steve Rollins at Summit Dental Group.

What Are Veneers?

Dental veneers are extremely thin covers applied to the front of teeth in need of cosmetic improvement. Once applied, the veneers conceal any cosmetic imperfections in the natural tooth. Such imperfections include discolorations, chips, cracks and more. Veneers are commonly made from porcelain, which closely resembles natural tooth enamel. Once applied, veneers look just like your natural teeth. To place veneers, a thin layer of enamel is first shaved off the tooth’s surface. Then the veneer is permanently cemented in place with an adhesive.

Benefits of Veneers

There are many ways dental veneers help you show off your best possible smile. They can be used to hide a variety of cosmetic imperfections. In Waterford, dental veneers are available at Summit Dental Group and can be used to correct or conceal the following flaws:

  • Chipped teeth
  • Teeth with cracks
  • Stained or discolored teeth
  • Oddly shaped teeth
  • Teeth with uneven surfaces
  • Teeth with uneven spacing

In addition to concealing a variety of cosmetic imperfections, another benefit of veneers is that they look like natural teeth. Dental veneers are custom made for you. The size, shape and color are all matched to your existing teeth so they blend right in. Once placed, no one will know you are wearing veneers. An additional benefit of dental veneers is that they are cemented in place so there is little risk of them falling off or slipping out of place. When cared for properly, veneers can last for many years.

Show off your best possible smile with dental veneers. They can completely transform the appearance teeth by concealing various cosmetic imperfections. For dental veneers in Waterford, MI, schedule an appointment with Dr. Rollins by calling Summit Dental Group at (248) 681-3600.


By Summit Dental Group
October 14, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
OralHealthConcernsforPreteens

As if the preteen years didn’t give kids and their parents enough to think about, new oral health concerns loom on the horizon. Along with major changes to the body, brain and emotions, additional risk factors for tooth decay and gum disease appear during adolescence — the period of development starting around age 10 and extending through the teen years that marks the transition from childhood to adulthood.

Even with declining rates of tooth decay across the nation, the cavity rate remains high during adolescence. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, 1 in every 5 adolescents has untreated tooth decay. What’s more, the onset of puberty — usually beginning around age 10-11 in girls and 11-12 in boys — brings changes in hormone levels that can affect gum health.

We all have millions of microorganisms in our mouth, representing hundreds of different species of mostly helpful, but some harmful, bacteria. Research has shown that total oral bacteria increases between ages 11 and 14, and new types of bacteria are introduced, including some that are not friendly to teeth and gums. Some unfamiliar microbes trigger an exaggerated inflammatory response to dental plaque, so gum bleeding and sensitivity are experienced by many children in this age group. In fact, “puberty gingivitis,” which peaks around age 11-13, is the most common type of gum disease found during childhood.

A combination of hormones, lifestyle changes and poor oral hygiene habits raises the risk of oral health problems among adolescents. A more independent social life may be accompanied by a change in eating habits and easier access to snacks and beverages that are sugary, acidic (like sports drinks and soda) or full of refined carbohydrates — none of which are tooth-healthy choices. And as children move toward greater independence, parents are less likely to micromanage their children’s personal care, including their oral hygiene routines. Good oral hygiene can keep dental plaque at bay, lowering the chance of having gingivitis and cavities. But let’s face it: Adolescents have a lot to think about, and keeping up with their oral health may not be top of mind.

To help your preteen stay on top of their oral health, keep healthy snacks at home for your children and their friends and make sure you are well stocked with supplies such as new toothbrushes, floss and toothpaste. In addition, most preteens (and teens) can benefit from gentle reminders about oral hygiene routines.

For optimal oral health through all stages of life, make sure your preteen keeps up with professional teeth cleanings and exams, and talk with us about whether fluoride treatments or sealants may be appropriate for your child.

For more on your child’s oral health, read “How to Help Your Child Develop the Best Habits for Oral Health” and “Dentistry & Oral Health For Children” in Dear Doctor magazine.